Composer and self-signed certificates

Today I wanted to add a package from our internal satis-repository to a composer.json-file. Easy thing!

I added the satis-server as repo to the composer.json like this:

    {
      "repositories": [{
        "type": "composer",
        "url": "https://example.com/satis",
      }]
    }

Fair enough! That’s it! Run composer and be happy:

$ composer require vendor/package

[Composer\Downloader\TransportException]
  The "https:/example.com/satis/packages.json" file could not be downloaded: SSL operation failed with code 1. OpenSSL Error messages:
  error:14090086:SSL routines:ssl3_get_server_certificate:certificate verify failed
  Failed to enable crypto
  failed to open stream: operation failed


require [--dev] [--prefer-source] [--prefer-dist] [--no-plugins] [--no-progress] [--no-update] [--update-no-dev] [--update-with-dependencies] [--ignore-platform-reqs] [--sort-packages] [-o|--optimize-autoloader] [-a|--classmap-authoritative] [--] [<packages>]...

WTF…???

Ah, yes! The servers certificate is signed by our internal Root-CA. As it’s an internal server that’s what we do. But how to get composer to know that? It took me a while. Adding the Root-Certificate to OpenSSL didn’t bring the expected results (might be due to Homebrew) as didn’t adding the cert to PHPs keystore (might be due to some weird setup on my machine).

But there surely has to be a way of getting satis (or Toran) up and running with self-signed certs!

There were many hacks around that disabled certificate validation altogether but that’s not what I wanted. And after a short question on Twitter I got a few ideas. Alexander Tureks idea was great: Adding “verify-peer” : “false” to the ssl-options of the repository. Sadly that didn’t do the trick. Finally Jordi Boggiano gave me a hint to a feature I hadn’t found in the composer-docs before: Add the RootCA-Certificate to the ssl-options of the repository (and to the project).

So now my composer.json looks like this:

{
  "repositories": [{
    "type": "composer",
    "url": "https://example.com/satis",
    "options" : {
      "ssl" : {
        "cafile" : "myrootca.crt"
      }
    }
  }]
}

The file “myrootca.crt” is a PEM-file that only contains the root-certificate. You can get it by calling openssl x509 -in <(openssl s_client -connect example.com:443 -prexit 2>/dev/null) > myrootca.crt. And myrootca.crt needs to be on the same level as the composer.json in your project.

Thanks Jordi for the fast response!

Hope that helps someone 😉



 
 architectural daughtsman, brother, developer, father, husband, master of forestry sciences, scout


3 thoughts on “Composer and self-signed certificates

  1. I’ve been dealing with this but don’t like the idea of committing the cert in the repo along with the projects code. Any place you think this could be placed globally?

  2. In the end the certificate can be anywhere on the local filesystem. Using a remote file is not possible, as composer immediately complains about “remote cafile streams are disabled for security purposes”.

    So you can either yourself put the file somewhere on your filesystem with the drawback that you need to tell every developer to download the file and adapt the composer.json accordingly.

    Or you can add a script to the composer.json that will download the file from a known (and possibly only from inside a firewall available) location and put it inside the developers folder. And don’t forget to add that file to the .gitignore – I’ve set up a little gist for that.

    Does that help?

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